A new, updated and expanded edition of our business bestseller, Future Work, is now out. It has a lot of exciting new content, as well as a fresh green jacket with testimonials from leading experts and executives.

The book covers the latest developments transforming the world of work, and demonstrates how pioneering organisations are adapting to rapid advances in communications technology, demographic shifts and changing attitudes to work.

With dozens of case studies, including new ones from Accenture, Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Shell, Swiss Re and WPP, the book sets out the compelling case for a revolution in organizational cultures and working styles to boost output, cut costs, give employees more freedom and contribute to a greener economy.

Making D&I real

Alison Maitland's picture

Newsweek has just published a thoroughly researched and readable report, Achieving Results: Diversity & Inclusion Actions with Impact, by specialist consultants Veronika Hucke and Lisa Kepinski. There's a section on flexibility at work, and an interview I gave them on 'Agile Work as a Business Enabler' (page 32).

Are we all flexible workers now?

Alison Maitland's picture

Well, not quite. But a large new survey of UK workers demonstrates both the rapid spread of new ways of working and the huge demand for them. A majority of 63% of permanent full time employees are now working flexibly - defined as working a different pattern than 9-5, and/or working virtually some or all of the time, for reasons of choice and balance. Of those not working flexibly, a majority (56%) say they would like to.

More men part-time working

Peter Thomson's picture

The Institute for Fiscal Studies has just issued a report showing that 1in 5 men aged from 25 to 55 in low paid jobs are now working part-time.  This compares with 1 in 20, 20 years ago.

Gender pay gap still at 18%

Peter Thomson's picture

A recent IFS report showed the gender pay gap in the UK reducing slowly but still stubbornly remaining at 18%, despite equal pay legislation and the impending requirement for pay audits.

Looking at the figures more closely reveals that the gap for highly educated women increases by 4% for each year taken out as a career break. Once women have taken time off for maternity it is very difficult to catch up with their male counterparts. As more men take parental leave this will help to close the gap but more can be done by leaders to level the playing field.

The Work Revolution - a special report

Alison Maitland's picture

I contributed three articles to the Financial Times' special report, The Work Revolution, on 30 June: an overview of how technology is banishing old, static ways of working in favour of agile innovations; a piece about how to manage virtual, dispersed teams; and a Q&A on implementing agile working in organisations.

When Work Works Awards 2016

Alison Maitland's picture

Professional services firm BDO USA, one of the case studies in our book, has just been announced as a winner of the 2016 When Work Works Awards, run by the Families and Work Institute and the Society for Human Resource Management. These awards judge workplaces on six evidence-based components: autonomy; work-life fit; supervisor support; satisfaction with earnings, benefits and promotion opportunities; opportunities for learning; and, crucially, a culture of trust.

Human needs and work

Alison Maitland's picture

What are the main ingredients of "a good work day"? According to research by Herman Miller Insight Group, the six key human needs are: Achievement, Autonomy, Purpose, Belonging, Security and Status. I was struck by how much this has in common with what we talk about in the book - especially the importance of management styles that enable people to achieve their full potential, with as much autonomy in their work as possible. 

The last rush hour?

Alison Maitland's picture

Fred Pilot, California-based author of Last Rush Hour, just interviewed Peter and me for a podcast about how work is changing in the 21st century. Fred is a healthcare specialist who now focuses on the decentralization of knowledge work - the topic of his book.

Absence management

Peter Thomson's picture

The latest CIPD survey on absence management has come up with an interesting conclusion. They say that "Employers that offer flexible working are significantly less likely to have reported illegitimate absence among their top five causes of short-term absence". This supports the evidence we found when writing the book: flexible workers don't have to lie about why they are taking time off work.

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